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Let’s Talk About Depression

***DUE TO THE SUBJECT OF THIS POST, I’M GOING TO GO AHEAD AND ISSUE A TRIGGER WARNING FOR DEPRESSION AND SUICIDE.****

ALSO, IF YOU ARE CONTEMPLATING SUICIDE, PLEASE, PLEASE CALL 911 OR THE EMERGENCY ASSITANCE NUMBER FOR YOUR COUNTRY.

I AM INCLUDING LINKS AND NUMBERS TO SITES WITH HELP RESOURCES AND HOTLINES AT THE END OF THIS POST.

 

Hello, lovies. I had a more upbeat post planned for today. I really did. In the light of the news surrounding Robin Williams, though, I had some things I just had to say.

Depression is a disease. If you’ve never experienced it, I am truly happy for you. The way the media approaches it rarely sheds light on it. It isn’t talked about enough, and it is severely misunderstood. The media only pays attention to this disease when someone commits suicide. The person is mourned and their story is turned into a warning label on what can happen when someone gets a disease they didn’t ask for.

Depression is an awful disease. It is almost like a parasite. It latches its way into your mind and eventually slithers all the way into your soul, causing all kinds of havoc on the way. Your self-esteem will be absolutely smashed. The world will seem gray, no matter what is happening. Optimism doesn’t exist when you are depressed. It seems almost too simple when you put it in words. Really, there is no way to describe the pain depression causes to someone who has never experienced it.

People seem to have to strong opinions about things they don’t understand. I’ve seen a lot of people say things like “It’s a coward’s way out!” or “Didn’t they care about the people that loved them?” I actually saw someone who had the nerve to say “It’s NOT a disease, it IS a choice.” Suicide doesn’t happen by accident–that much is true. Unfortunately, people do think about their family and friends when they think about suicide. At the point they’re at, depression has probably led them to think that their family and friends will be better off without them in the long run (which of course is NOT true).

Mental health, for some reason I do not understand, has become a taboo in our society. Believe it or not, though, depression IS a disease. Suicide is a side effect of this disease. Like I said earlier, suicide is seen as a sort of “warning label” attached to depression. When we talk about depression, all we talk about are the people who committed suicide. We don’t focus on the ones that came out of it, the ones that decided last minute not to take their own life. We don’t talk about how amazing it is to wake up one day and realize that you are above your lowest point. I can promise you that if you just keep going through—even if it takes having to stay in a hospital until your treatment starts to work—the happiness with be so much higher than anything you’ve ever felt. After I got through that bone-crushingly painful low, even now that I’ve been okay for over a year, I get tears of relief when I think about where I was a year ago versus where I am now.

I think that as a society, we should stop treating mental health as if mental diseases are a choice. No one signs up for them. We don’t get them by being exposed to other people who are ill, and we can’t eat, drink, or smoke our way to them. Let’s start treating it like any other cancer or illness. It’s time to shed light on it. Once we start treating it like any other illness, people won’t be so afraid to step up and admit they are sick and get the treatment they need.

HERE IS A LINK TO THE INTERNATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION WIKI, INCLUDING PHONE NUMBERS AND WEBSITES TO PLACES THAT CAN PROVIDE HELP.

That’s all I have for you today, lovies. I’ll have a much happier blog for you tomorrow.

Love,

Kara

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3 thoughts on “Let’s Talk About Depression

  1. Very well said. The lack of education about mental illness still amazes me. I have a family member who suffers from mental illnesses every day of her life. I was mentioning her to someone and they said…”well, aren’t there group homes for people like her?”….as if she was mentally challenged and born that way. In other words, they did not even know the definition of “mental illnes”. Why don’t people understand that ANYONE can develop a mental illness? It is out of their control. They can be perfectly fine and then it can strike them in their teens, their twenties…and even much later.
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this. 🙂

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    1. Thanks! It really is astonishing (and not in a good way) the taboo that surrounds mental health and mental illness. I’ve had anxiety and depression most of my life and I learned a lot when I “came out” with my problems. I want to help others that are too scared to ask for help because they think they’ll be judged!

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  2. Well spoken Kara! I, too, have suffered with depression and anxiety for most of my life and its awful. Feeling alone and ashamed intensifies the symptoms. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

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